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Website Analysis #6- Navigation

27 Mar

Navigation is something that Skeptoid could improve upon. Though the site is fairly intuitive, more attention could be given to how information is presented. The index page of the site has three broad columns of information after the site’s main banner and drop-down menus. The central column has most of the relevant information for a first time user. It tells them who Brian Dunning is, what Skeptoid’s mission is, and its accomplishments. However, having all that information presented in the dead center of the page can be intimidating to the first time user. The walls of text add to that type of structure. The argument could be made that Skeptoid is a niche site and should thus not have to worry about having an visually appealing layout. However, making the site more dynamic could increase the amount of repeat traffic, instead of a new user being linked to the site and being lost in the cascade of information on the front page. Overall, I would recommend that Dunning get a graphic designer to help him make his site more accessible.

That being said, navigation is consistent throughout the site, and the main navigation features are at the top of each webpage. I would recommend that Dunning move the “Most Popular” sidebar to the top banner with the rest of the navigation. A new user should be able to be impulsive and click on podcasts and articles that are representative of the site. The “Most Popular” podcasts and the newest ones should be illuminated more, to show that the site isn’t just text. On the other hand, all major forms of content are just one click from the main page. The “About Us”, contact,  and correction pages are the first links on the top banner. The home page’s dominant headline and pictures are first an introduction to the site and Dunning. They are followed by the most recent podcasts and articles, which do have some related pictures, such as a picture of Nikola Tesla next to the podcast about him.

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Posted by on March 27, 2013 in Compostions, Website Analysis

 

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